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advisory on hurrican irene. we want to go to rob marciano who will tell us what this latest advisory is about. >> it's frightening, up to 85-mile-an-hour wind now. there's a possibility from reading some nuggets from the national hurricane center that it could strengthen some more. we knew we had that possibility. still over the gulf stream where waters are still warm enough to sustain a hurricane. also getting into an environment where it favored strengthening. that's what we've seen. here it is in the satellite picture. 85-mile-an-hour winds. that's a moderate strength category one storm with possible strengthening as we go through time. about 380 miles south of new york city it's movement has picked up northerly about 15 miles an hour and we still expect that turn toward the west later on. this is huge. reading some technical stuff, the tropical storm force winds, diameter nearly 800 miles wide. that is huge. the second largest tropical system we've seen in the last few decades. hurricane force winds extend 150 miles out. the amount of damaging winds is about 350 to 400 m
you can see the trees. hurricane irene they lost enough trees. $22,000 worth of trees fell down. this storm expected to be much tougher, more devastating than hurricane irene. look at this. that's a scaffold around an art project. new york city is full of scaffolding like that. things that we are watching today. want to head it over now to "cnn newsroom." newsroom." they're up next. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning to you. i sure hope you're keeping dry somewhere. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for being with us. we begin this morning with hurricane sandy, within hours expected to explode into this superstorm. most of us have never season anything like it in our lifetime. already huge, tropical storm force winds spanning a width of nearly 1,000 mimes. it's aiming at the heart of the east coast, the most heavily populated corridor in the country. 50 million people are expected to feel the effects. hundreds of thousands are now under evacuation orders. fema predicts damage costs of about $3 billion just for wind damage alone. heavy rains or snow, storm
the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
here, the effects of sandy, are already worse than what we saw with irene. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> now, you see you have packed up the dog. you were under a mandatory evacuation, but you did decide to wait until this moment. did you think that there was a time you could actually ride it out? >> yeah. >> we did until the winds really started picking up. the tide wasn't going out at all, and it was well past high tide. >> i think a lot of public officials are going to be glad that you are heeding the warning and deciding to get out. i'm going to let you get on with your boat. thank you very much for waiting. suzanne, i also want you to take a look down the street here. the guy that you see in the scuba gear, his name is paul. he is a lifeguard. paul, come on over here and talk to me here for a moment. take off the goggles and what not. i know you have been down here in the neighborhood. you've been monitoring things. obviously, you're dressed appropriately for the occasion, but i know a lot of public officials want folks like you to head on out. >> um, yes. however, i'm real clos
much for the water to come up over the walls. last year, for hurricane irene, these residents had to be evacuated. so, this time around, they're ready for the worst. east coast communities going on the offensive. building sand walls, securing property and stocking up on supplies, as the superstorm closes in. after being pounded last year by hurricane irene with its record storm surge and feet of flooding, new york residents are once again bracing for the worst. damage from irene topped $14 billion. and sandy could wreak even more havoc. >> certainly having lived through it. i lost everything in my basement. i had up to ten feet of water in my house. this is a concern. >> reporter: governor cuomo has declared a state of emergency in preparation for sandy's impact. and mayor michael bloomberg warned new york city residents to brace themselves. >> there's the possibility of parts of our city flooding or high winds that could force certain bridges to be closed. >> reporter: last year, in advance of irene, mayor bloomberg made the unprecedented order to evacuate low-lying areas of the
as the rainfall forecast on the north side, there's not a lot. don't ft. big flooding like we had with irene but once you get to the south side that's the heavy amount so, again, veroni a veronica, sandy has intensified expect to get up to 90-mile-per-hour winds right before landfill this afternoon. we didn't want a stronger storm and it looks like we could be dealing with that shortly. >> what are you talking about, are you saying category 2, 3? >> it doesn't look like it will get to a category 2 and making that hybrid transition anyway so they probably won't go up to a category 2 but the fact the stronger the winds the more water this storm can push and that high tide cycle this morning and a couple of hours will be bad but the one tonight, that's the one that could be historic. >> bill, we'll check back with you. >>> much of southern new york will feel the biggest impact from this storm. right now we go to reporter tracy strahan of wnbc in rock way beach, this morning. tracy, what is it looking like right now? >> reporter: like these waves will quickly be approaches the boardwalk where we
, former dnc chair and vermont governor howard dean is facing off against ed conard. irene rosenfeld, the ceo of mondolez international. the markets aren't to be forgotten. at 8:30 eastern time, we will be joined by jim grant. we're going to talk about the best investing strategies for the rest of the year with him. first, let's get you up to speed on this morning's headlines. over to andrew. >>> friday we'll get the government september jobs report. could be a game changer for the election. we'll get a hint of what may be to come. the employment report coming at 8:15 eastern time. poll forecasters say the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the compan
and irene many did not see the extent of the damage coming. adam shapiro is doing looking for us. it will be flooding. that is what noaa is most concerned about. at 3:00 p.m. update they talked about the full moon and full moon cycles will create higher storm surge. what they can't say what part of the east coast will face the worst part of that storm surge. right now they are saying there is 90% certainty that the storm is doing, hurricane sandy right now, by the time it hits the united states or tropical storm or cyclone sandy, 90% certainty it will hit the united states monday night. once it hits and rain and rain and rain. according to noaa it will be a two or three day event tore most people, bringing in west virginia up to two feet of snow because it will impact with the other storm systemming coming out of the west. it is a cold front, when the cold front hits, snow in west virginia, snow in pennsylvania, snow in ohio. up to eight inches in pennsylvania and ohio. analysis from noaa, says roughly 10 inches of rain. hurricane irene dumped a lot of water on new jersey, vermon
, than last year's hurricane irene. with winds near 80 miles an hour, right now hurricane sandy is moving north along the eastern seaboard, already impacting portions of florida and georgia. mary thompson is tracking preparations ahead of the big storm. >> it's already been dubbed frankenstorm over the halloween horror story at lowe's. the east coast of course bracing for a storm with potential to do billions in damage. the latest update from noaa says heavy rains and flooding is forecast in the mid-atlantic states but high winds could be felt from the carolinas all the way up through new england. corporate america's prepping to serve both customers and protect its employees in light of this storm. at lowe's, a 24-hour command center tracks the storm while it shipped generators, batteries, chainsaws and other items in high demand after the storm to northeast markets expected to be impacted by sandy. as for the power provider, citi noting four with big exposure to the mid-atlantic and pennsylvania areas where the heaviest rains and flooding are forecast. banks saying any earnings risks for
, and the like. just to give you some perspective, last year, during irene, large sections of roads were washed away here in north carolina. power was knocked out to about half a million people, and seven people died. so, even -- and that was a low-end storm. i wouldn't really read in to much to the fact that this is a tropical storm or a low-end hurricane. either way the effects are going to be devastating and now is the time when people really do need to prepare, alex. >> i'm glad you're putting that reminder out there. it's absolutely true. just because it says tropical storm right now, don't let your guard down. julie martin, thanks for watching things for us from north carolina. we're going to check back in with dylan dreyer at the bottom of the hour for the very latest on the path of the storm. al roker will also be coming our way from delaware. >>> back to politics now. today republican presidential nominee mitt romney heads for florida to campaign with senator marco rubio. governor romney and vice presidential candidate paul ryan had a big rally in ohio, and today congressman ryan is on
into new england so we don't have much to compare to. irene last year, then you can go back to hazel in the '50s, but most people don't remember that so this has a chance to be one for the record books. >> to underline it for people on the east coast, when will they feel impact? >> florida today and tomorrow but big impacts sunday north carolina, up through mid-atlantic, monday into tuesday morning. >> early in the week. thanks for keeping an eye on it. >>> let's turn to sports. game one of the world series between giants and tigers in san francisco. ra cy young winner justin verlander making the start on a lot of rest and he was rusty. pablo sandoval gets one over the center field wall. giant with a 1-0 lead on that solo shot. his big night just getting started. third inning, giant up 2-0. sandoval going the other way off verlander. two-run home run, sneaks over the wall. giants up big there. verlander allowed -- had allowed just two runs in his previous three starts this postseason. gave up five in just four innings last night. meanwhile, barry zito dealing, triking out danny wuert
? >> well, charlie, it's a major disaster in new jersey. and, you know i've gone through irene, the october snow storm, the blizzard in 2010. this is, by far, the worst thing we've gone through. we have 2.4 million people or households, rather without power, over 200 state roads closed. it wasn't actually a levee. it was a berm and the berm was overwhelmed by the tidal surge that came up the raritan bay. we are in the process of rescue rescuing people from moonachie, in middlesex county rescuing people from their homes not from river flooding but tidal surge from the bays. not even to mention what's happened on the jersey coastline, which i think in the long run will be the part of the state that's the most devastate ed ed. you saw the scenes yesterday from up and down our coast. new jersey, obviously, this is where it came onshore. i think the state of new jersey took it in the neck worse than any other state. it's going to take us a while to dig out from under it but we will dig out from under it. >> many people waking up now to all the damage. can you calculate how mu
hurricane irene, we achieved a 98% evacuation rate. but for whatever reason, this time, we haven't reached that number yet. we think we're somewhere having evacuated several thousand people. but we still have too many people in atlantic city. that creates a very uncomfortable situation for all of our emergency responders and officials are still trying to do the best we can to get people out of harm's way. >> mayor, ali velshi is on the streets of atlantic city. right now, the winds are obviously very gusty. ali, you have a question you'd like to ask the mayor. >> reporter: yes, i do, mayor. and the important thing is by looking at atlantic city, people can look at this and say, this might happen in my community. if you're still not evacuated, what do you do? i know people are driving around. they can get out in their car but it's gusty and dangerous. should people leave and go to a shelter now or hunker down and stay? >> at this point, i think they would be best served to stay at home and hunker down. i just visited a couple of our shelters. i had a very difficult time getting back to wher
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
summer's hurricane irene cost more than $15.8 billion in damages after hitting an area from north carolina to maine. in 1972 hurricane agnes did more than $11.7 billion of damage. it went from florida to long island, new york. let's check in with bill karins. he is a upstairs. where is it now and where is it headed in the next few hours? >>> it's amazing it's safely off the shore. it's not causing too much damage or chaos yet. we'll watch landfall this evening probably around 8 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. that's when the destruction will be done during the high tide cycle and the winds. this morning is not horrible. here's the new forecast in the hurricane center. it increases in intensity. it could go up to 90 miles per hour. a healthy category one just off the "jersey shore." it will make the hook. the unusual historic cal hook to the left into the jersey shore. the winds will be in the center including from the central jersey shore. possibility of 80 mile per hour winds. we may be out there on the tip of long island, somewhere on the south shore be able to get a gust to 90. that's very,
to at the top-- top, it's the widest hurricane we've seen. hurricane irene came last august. she came knocking on the door and no one was listening. hurricane sandy is in the house and neither presidential candidate can walk away from what is happening. we've got to begin to plan for what's ahead. the reaction is that it's over. milk is spilt. the climate is changing rapidly. we've got a super storm that is right in front of us. we've got the hurricane coming in off the atlantic. it's met up with a nor'easter, and then to flow this thing into epic proportion, we're missing 1.35 million square miles of ice in the arctic. so all the heat in the arctic ocean is thrown up into the atmosphere and the jet stream, as it loops south as far south as well into this hurricane and we've got ourselves a super storm. hello. it's time to get into it. >> cenk: dr. halter, let me read you a quote from rutgers situation. she writes, the situation is consistent with what i would expect to see more often as a result of unabated warming especially the amplification of the warming in the arctic. you just mentioned
say it can be worse than irene. >> don't pay attention to it being downgraded. it doesn't mean anything. it's not really completely a tropical storm. it's going to be transitioning to what we kind of consider a nor'easter. we are accustomed to nor'easters. that kind of a event. moisture associated with a tropical storm. tropical storm holds a lot more water in the atmosphere as it transitions. that water is still going to be there radar picture showing the rain is following across parts of the carolinas. the rain is going to be heavy all day. battering waves, a lot of wind. beach erosion and that sort of thing here. go forward on the track of this storm. continues to move northeast. takes this unprecedented left-hand hook. that's where we've begin to go through a transition to a different type of a storm. people are used to hurricanes strengthening when there is warm water. this isn't going to be strengthening for those purpose purposes. snran way a nor'easter strengthens. european model track shows this. right around parts of jiewj. i want to point out other things on this map
be worse than irene, because this storm will hold its strength, back off as usual, and then feed into the winter storm. this is why it's unusual, because everybody is going to be watching it. it is going to look like it is going to go out to sea and then it looks like it will be pulled back towards the west. >> bill: irene was the one where there was so much flooding in the northeast. >> yes, this is going to be flooding rains very strong winds, and with the right angle for place like chesapeake bay, the south shores of long island and even into new york city if it comes in at the right angle. and it could be a worse-case scenario for some of those places. >> bill: i think maryland is probably drawn -- >> yes. >> i have a very important question, wednesday is halloween, and i have two kids at home that are going to freak out -- if they go out. what is going to happen on halloween. >> it will be a weakening storm, but still strong high pressure gusty winds, with the snow starts to fly higherel indications in parts of west virginia and parts of ohio and penn
. irene was lots of water. we had extensive flooding. we don't expect anything near than that. this is serious storm. it will on us for a long time, three days or so with gale force or better winds. >> reporter: that was an emergency official we spoke with earlier. one issue i wanted to bring to your attention. water is coming up. beach is coming close to the sand dunes and ten miles there was a $37 million beach restoration program. a lost those homes are protected because of that new beach restoration which did hold up with hurricane irene. they have a lot of faith to keep their homes safe. people in those low-lying areas can expect extreme flooding. there were no mandatory evacuations in this area. so people who did leave left on their own accord. >> jamie: always good to take the safe route. elizabeth, i know you will be riding out the storm. keep us posted. thank you. >> gregg: brand-new report out shows the economy is growing, but, you know what, if you dig deeper, it's not good news at all. why some experts are saying there is a lot more behind those numbers. >> jamie:
a tropical storm force. >> bill: how does this compare to irene? >> irene -- it is bigger in diameter and in terms of forward speed it is moving slower. let's take new york city for example. it is the worst case sen their you in terms of what is the worst side of the storm you could be on? when you are on the eastern quadrant that is usually where the winds are the strongest and that's why we're expecting the high water rise. >> bill: all right. ray stagich on such a busy day you are so good to spend time with us. appreciate it. >> all right. thank you. >> bill: nobody knows it better than these guys. is what they live for, and we depend on them. >> yeah. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." ♪ because again, we're in the oh my goodness! oh my gosh this looks amazing! that's a good deal! [ man ] wow! it is so good! [ male announcer ] our new maine stays! 15 entrees under $15 seafood, chicken and more! oo! the tilapia with roasted vegetables! i'm actually looking at the wood grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. you so fascinated by the prices, you
of the season. with memories of hurricane irene fresh on everyone's minds, hurricane companies are bracing for the worst. >> getting our resources ready, making sure the people are ready, getting everything in order. >> reporter: in maryland, batteries, radiators, and generators flew off the shelves. >> talking five or six days possibility, therefore, you got to set a plan for that. >> reporter: planning that could save lives. hurricane sandy is blamed for 21 deaths across the caribbean. in cuba, nine people were killed as sandy toppled houses, ripped off roofs, and flooded neighborhoods. in the dominican republic, flash flooding buried cars and trees under water. and in jamaica, most of the eastern part of the island remains without power, and even now, flash flooding remains a danger. >> right now, that area right there. >> reporter: now faced with news of sandy's destructive potential, those living in her path can only do their best as they prepare for the worst. >> last week we talked about the fact we hadn't had any hurricanes this year, and here we are. >> reporter: the storm surge
for a very long time because of a storm and it was just last year with hurricane irene that brought a lot of power outages for a very lengthy time to the state of connecticut. >> that's right, i would contrast this storm from the deratio we experienced this summer, where it same upon us all at once, we didn't have the time to stage our crews. this time we have several days warning, we're staging our crews, but again, this is going to be a very, very severe storm. mr. owens, meteorologist chad myers has a question for you. >> this is going to be one of those big storms, it's going to be windy for a long time and people are going to lose power at the beginning and are going to be very impatient in the beginning, and you won't put crews out there until what purpose? you're obviously not going to put men in bucks at 60? >> yes, we'll wait until the wind dies down. so obviously, we're only going to have those crews seek to restore service. you first have to assess the damage and we believe that there will be substantial physical destruction of our infrastructure, we're going to have to assess
is on script. and that is that this afternoon's tide will be as bad as the perfect storm '92/irene of last year. and that tonight's tide, along with the entirety of long island sound on our side, could be catastrophic. that's what we're planning for. we hope it's avoided somehow and some way, but if you look at all the surge maps, it's connecticut that will be most adversely impacted. >> yeah. and you know what? i covered connecticut for quite some time many years ago. and there are neighborhoods on the coastline that get flooded during a thunderstorm. >> yeah. >> how are you going to keep homes from getting decimated up and down the connecticut coastline if. >> listen, we've ordered evacuations or suggested ev evacuations that affect 362,000 people, one out of every ten residents of the state of connecticut. but it's the small towns and it's the big cities. it's new haven, bridge fort, stamford, norwalk, fairfield, they're all going to be adversely impacted. we're waiting to see. if this hits 11 feet with waves on top of 11 feet, we're talking about dike systems being overrun. that's the sever
in new york harbor right now, a half a foot higher than hurricane irene. when the high tide starts to flood in late this afternoon, early this evening, we'll see record-breaking surge hikes. >> does that mean water goes in the subway? >> probably. >> probably. >> i don't know what kind of sandbagging efforts that they're going to be having in place. i mean, since irene, i know they've taken some steps to see if they can get some sort of better protection from subway entrances, but the official forecast is calling for a 10 hfgs to 12-foot storm tide and it only needs to be 10.5 feet to flood the subway. >> jeff, we've seen the pictures. we keep hearing the adjectives colossal, gigantic, to describe it. almost in november, cold in the north. how does a storm like this size form? >> well, it started in the caribbean, which it's always warm enough year around to make hurricanes form. and once it got north of the caribbean it found itself right over the gulf stream, at least over the past day or so, and it was in a very unique spot, right over an axis of the warm gulf stream waters that
had during hurricane irene about flooding in lower manhattan and damage on long island jersey shore come in to play. farther north talking about new england. in any case effects over the entire northeast part of the u.s. this is going to be just a high-profile, high-threat event, it looks like that we're talking about well into next week. and we really need to be paying close attention, because this is unprecedented, as best we can tell. >> bryan norcross, not such good news. very worrying. thanks for your expertise. >>> democrats seizing the opportunity to try to link mitt romney to richard mourdock's comments about rape and abortion in the indiana race. republicans insist what women care about most is the economy. >> what he said was crazy, but having said that, this election for president is not about that. >> joining me now is washington senator, washington senator patty murray, who of course chairs the democratic senatorial campaign committee. your job in this election is to make sure that democrats get re-elected and you don't lose control of the senate. richard mourdock could
, irene didn't do too much to new york city. but it certainly did a lot to vermont. and will this storm do something similar as it's stalling. here all the models bringing it up from the city down to about washington, d.c. but the big thing is it stops, it stops moving for 48 hours and it could rain for two days and make flooding. if it rains a half an inch an hour for 48 hours, that's two feet of rain in any one spot. that is going to cause significant flash flooding and the potential for big loss of life. >> chad, thanks for the update. we may well come back to you before the end of the show. appreciate it. >>> let's get back to politics and the subject of race. outspoken conservative ann coulter has a lot to say about just about everything, in fact. the new subject of her new book is "mugged, racial demagoguery" dedicated to quote, the freest black man in america. we'll discover who that is. ann coulter, welcome back. >> thank you. good to be here. >> i know you have been struggling with a bit of a cold. >> you have an unfair advantage about it tonight. >> you have been whining about it
year during irene there was a lot of talk that it came in as a strong tropical storm, but this will be a strong storm and a large one, and they will impact us many many different ways. one of the ways we'll be impacted, and it was noted on the last hurricane advisory was it was storm surge. that's not just the rain falling from the sky. we're going to get a lot of rain, and we'll see the piling up of the water in dangerous areas, possibly long island sound or even new york harbor. what happens when the hurricane winds -- once it starts getting into that shallow coastal area, it has nowhere else to go, brook, but up and out and inland. storm surge can travel many, many miles. we've seen that before with past hurricanes. this is a big concern for this system particularly, amongst many others like power outages. >> okay. sort of like the perfect storm all these conditions coming together. we'll look for it monday night into tuesday. bonnie, thank you. >>> big heads up on some supreme court cases we're going to be watching for this week. it could stop you from getting rid
with these winds. i was out on the beach with irene for over 12 hours and this is about when i felt it. this storm is still a couple hundred miles away and the winds are gusting over 50 miles per hour. the highest surge will come in at about later this evening and go through this evening we will see the surge 6 to 8 feet. look at the atlantic. it is just ramped up, 10 to 12 footers out there. this is low tide. normally on a typical day you would have 150 feet of beach. it's all gone. and as that next high tide comes in we're going to see the worst of the beach erosion, coastal damage. this whole beach area will be rearranged. so far no reports of any significant damage, but some of the areas south of here, the dunes have been eaten by the wave action and some of the local authorities think some of those homes are going to be hit and fall into the atlantic later on tonight. so, it's only going to get worse from here and inland when these winds crank up over 60 hils per hour, d.c., baltimore, philly away from the beaches this afternoon and tonight that's going to shut down power to millions. once we
know, when we had irene come through last year, it was -- we were preparing for a category 1 plus storm. we ordered mandatory evacuation, we shut down the subway system. the bridges, some of them were shut down when the winds kicked up. that was a hurricane and that storm came through very quickly and we were able to get through it quickly. this has now turned into a nor'easter. it was a hurricane, went to a t tropical storm, now has gone down to a nor'easter. still huge in size. these are things that we're seeing. there's a lot more -- lot of what we're seeing is more violent. we are seeing more tornadoes. it's unusual but it's the second time we ordered mandatory evacuation, probably only two times in the history of the city that's been done. since i've been here. overall, i think we got to do the things that are necessary to tell the public that this is a serious matter. we want them to be safe. >> thank you very much, joseph bruno. i'll just add to that, i have never seen manhattan like this. as i said, all the neighborhood stores are closed and the starbucks are closed. everything
. irene is calling us from baltimore. what do you say irene. are you there? >> caller: yes, i am. >> bill: hi, what's your point. >> caller: they are trying the same way with bill clinton and white water with monica lewinsky, spend millions of dollars on lies. now obama speaks the truth to the people. there's no reason for this. >> bill: i thought joe biden laid it out clearly exactly what the facts were. >> caller: yes he did. and to be a republican, you have to be a liar, a cheat and a thief. >> bill: well, i appreciate it. thank you so much. look the facts in this, what's going on is the republicans are doing something, if democrats did this, they would have been crying bloody murder. republicans are taking a terrorist attack against americans, the murder of an american ambassador, and trying to exploit that, use it for cheap political purposes. it's disgusting. it's despicable. it's something we all ought to condemn. on the campaign front here's a recognizable voice the latest ad put out by the obama campaign morgan freeman returns to do his job. >> every president inherits challenges
that to the list of things to do. >> i am being serious. this is very much like irene a couple of years ago but worse than that . we'll be dealing with a hybrid storm and super storm that emerges with a cold tront and hurricane inside of a nor'easter. if that sounds scary, you need to be prepared for the storm. it could be potentially devastating. millions of people will be affected by still a hurricane. we will see tropical storm force win and rain all across the coast of florida and extending 300 miles from the storm.this storm will get bigger. it hugs the coast over the weekend and tuesday, dc, philly and new york. you could see a storm packing winds of 60 or 80 miles per hour for hours and hours . storm surge as well with high tide. this being be an event that we have not seen in our lifetime. gretchen, you need to understand your evacuation route this weekend. >> gretchen: i will be calling up jd, help me find my evacuation route. >> i will help you. >> brian: we'll show up at your door. >> you, too, brian. you live close to the coast. >> brian: one anchor ahead. >> steve: can't yell a
during irene. i want. i live across the river. they were -- they say they're fine but i said get observe here, i'll take you home. >> any word on when they will come out? are officials going for them in boats or trucks? do you know when they're going to arrive? >> looks staggered. i got one aunt and took her to a cousin's house. yeah, go outside, flag someone down. >> right. it's hard to get information. best of luck. this is the case. officials are doing the best they can but it's hard to keep tabs who is here, who is not. we see cars streaming in all the time as people go in. water here. there are towels, dry clothes. people are coming off trucks and boats with just the clothes on their back, maybe a small bag, some have no shoes. trying to get them as much as they need. officials on the teeterboro airport came over looking for someone saying we've got supplies, we want to help you out and give you supplies. imagine officials more than happy to hear that. but these residents are absolutely shocked. not expecting this. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there
in white plains, where literally trees are ripped from its roots. >> amazing stuff. first, irene, now sandy. for two consecutive years, costly deadly hurricanes hit the northeast. we're hear a lot of people say if irene was a wake-up call, sandy is a bucket of water that should snap us all to attention. let's listen to andrew cuomo, the governor of new york. >> there has been a series of extreme weather incidents. anyone that is not a political statement, that is not a factual statement. anyone who says there is not a dramatic change in weather patterns, i think is denying reality. and i would like to say that this is probably the last occurrence we will have. i don't believe that. >> cuomo went on to say new york now seems to get a 100 year flood every two years. joining me now is ben strauss, the chief operating officer and director of the program on sea level rise at climate central. is this a sign of things to come? governor cuomo is saying we seem to be getting 100-year storm every two years. >> this was actually -- since 1900, three of the top ten highest flood levels have occurred in
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